What is Assembly Language

Assembly Language

History

Assembly language was developed in 1960’s which is a low-level programming language for computer. To convert it to executable machine code, a utility program called assembler is used.

 

What is Assembly Language?

An assembly language is a low-level programming language for computer that is abbreviated as asm and is specific to computer architecture. It can also be known as symbolic machine code. To convert it to executable machine code, a utility program called assembler is used and the process is called assembly. The computational step in which an assembler run is called assembly time. Each low-level machine instruction or opcode is represented by using mnemonics. One or more operands are required by several operations to form complete instruction. Operands such as expressions of numbers, named constants, registers, and labels are taken by most of the assemblers. To control the assembly process, and for debugging, additional mechanisms are offered by many assemblers to facilitate development of program.

 

What it is used for?

  1. Code that must interact directly with the hardware
  2. In an embedded processor or DSP
  3. Program that uses processor-specific instructions
  4. To create vectorized functions
  5. When extreme optimization is required

 

Advantages

  1. Programs are replaceable by mnemonics
  2. Memory Efficient
  3. No need to keep track of memory locations
  4. Faster in speed
  5. Fewer instructions are required
  6. Hardware oriented

 

Average salary

In USA, the average salary of an Assembly language programmer is $75,000 per year.

 

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